Archery

Mos and I have been looking for a hobby to get us out of the house and to give us something to do together. And there is a lot to chose from around here. Volunteering is also something we’d like to look into at a later date. After looking around at a few different options we decided to give archery a go.

There is a very good archery club not far from our house (about 12 minutes by scooter). It’s on the same site as Stardome golf club right on the south-west corner of the old cities wall. It has a shop, which stocks all sorts of archery goodies along with a large selection of camping and outdoors gear. There is also a little coffee shop in the range and most importantly… free WiFi. Also, and arguably more important to the development of are archery skills, they have a team of very good instructors.

The range itself, assuming you’ve never been to one is not to dissimilar to that of a golf driving range. And if you’ve never been to one of those, I’ll describe it. Next to the coffee and archery shops there is a concreted area about 30-meters wide and four deep, the shooting platform. The platform is segmented into stations, each with a bench, an arrow rack and a hook to hang your bow. The shops are one side, and on the other an expanse of grass the same width as the shooting platform reaching back to about 100-meters. This area of grass is surrounded by netting, designed to control and catch stray arrows. Arranged on the grass are targets each about two meters squared with a paper archery target on. They are made of compacted foam blocks and are placed at head hight using wooden stands. There is one target per station on the platform and each target can be moved forwards or back to a suitable distance for the archer at that station. The platform itself is shaded by a futuristic looking metal roof with fans to keep archers cool.

I had previously emailed the club to enquiry about lessons. A few hours later Mos and I had booked in for a 30-minute ‘discovery’ course. During this half hour we learnt the basics of archery, along with the rules and regulations of the club. For example, everyone has to collect their arrows from the target at the same time. A simple but brilliantly effective way to stop people getting impaled by accident. A slice of common sense that is rare in Asia.

We each practised using a Samick Polaris recurve bow. ‘Samick’ is the brand, ‘Polaris’ is the model and ‘recurve’ is the type of the bow. In modern archery two basic types of bow are used, the recurve and the compound. The recurve bow is probably the type you picture when you think about archery. Similar to the classic longbow of English medieval archers and the bow of Robin Hood. A recurve bow is actually a bit more advanced. It gets it’s name from the tips of the bow curving forward, almost pointing to the target. This gives it that little bit extra power. A modern recurve bow has three components, the grip and the two ‘arms’. I don’t know the proper names. The ‘arms can be made from laminated wood or a special plastic/fibreglass/carbon fiver magic material. And the grip can be made from anything solid. Ours had a wooden grip and plastic ‘arms’.

A compound bow on the other hand looks like it was a design collaboration between a military special forces unit and Batman. It contains pulleys, dampers, buffers, sights and all sorts of other gadgets. And although they looks like they have many strings, it is infant one sting wrapped intricately around the system of pulleys. The reason for this engineering madness is to enable the archer to hold their aim for much longer. The pulley system on a compound bow means that as the archer reaches full pull and is ready to release, the amount of force required to hold the string in that position is much less than a recurve bow. Resulting in more time to acquire the target and hopefully a more accurate shot.

The only difference between my kit and the kit Mos had was the arrows. We both had a set of seven fairly beaten old carbon fibre arrows. But mine were longer. The arrow length is determined by how far back you pull the string. My arms are longer, I pull back further, so needed longer arrows. We also had arm guards, to stop the string slapping our forearms and a leather finger cover for pulling back the string.

Towards the end of our session our targets were looking pretty destroyed. So we decided to have one more round of seven arrows on fresh targets. Head to head, husband versus wife. We both hit the target with all of our arrows, so that was already an improvement on earlier shots. But the real question was, who won… Well, Mos got closest to dead centre (by two millimetres), but, I got the highest points total. And we all know, consistency is a winner.

We both did better than we’d expected, although I was slightly better. I imagine that’s down to my English blood line and the possibility of being a distant relative to Robin Hood. To prove that we are both now capable archers we’ve stuck our targets on the wall at home. Hopefully the tax man takes note next time he visits.

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