Absence

So, this is my first update in what feels like years. The lack of writing has been caused to a number of factors. I’ll try to cover as many of them as I can, and can remember now. One of the main reasons for me to start writing this blog was to have a detailed journal of what I’ve done, the adventures I’ve had and the trouble I’ve caused. Hopefully this update will fill the gaps that are missing.

MacBook Pro

There’s only one logical place to start in this update, at the beginning. It happened a couple of days after my last update. My MacBook Pro laptop melted. I know that sounds like an exaggeration, but it’s not. I’ve had this MacBook since starting my last job in London. It was a company laptop, which was already four years old when I was given it. Whilst at the company it had been used for high demand editing, audio work, rendering and all sorts of other recording and mixing tasks. When I left the company, they gave me the laptop. By this point, in terms of video and audio work this laptop was very out of date and underpowered. This was highlighted by the battery failing shortly before I left. I don’t want to sound ungrateful, it was a great gift, but at that point the laptop was well past its prime.

Almost immediately after leaving the company, in March 2012 I packed my bags and headed back to, what at that point was my second home, the island of Koh Tao, Thailand. It was a few weeks before my wedding. At this point I hadn’t even started this blog. As you can imagine my mind was elsewhere. I had a whole new family to get to know. I had a paradise island to live on, and my friends around me.

Since entering the heat and humidity of South East Asia with me, the MacBook Pro hasn’t been under an average temperature of 30⁰C. Well apart from a few nights in air-conditioned hotel rooms in Malaysia during business/visa trips. As with all technology, the cooler you can keep it the better it performs. And as you probably already know, laptops have internal cooling fans to pull air through the machine and keep it cool. Which is great if your laptop it heating up to 60⁰C+. A steady stream of cool British air would pull that temperature back down to a more stable 30⁰C. However, when the laptop is in the humid heat of Thailand, rather than the cool British countryside, the air it pulls in is already warm.

One night, I left the laptop on overnight, it was downloading some television shows from the UK. By the time I woke up, the MacBook had failed. I rushed it to the local repair shop, then to a registered Apple repair shop. The diagnosis was grim. The logic board had overheated, with a last recorded temperature of 97⁰C. The logic board is the brain of a MacBook. So I was now left with a choice. I could replace the logic board at a cost of nearly £400, or I could let my brain-dead machine die in peace (in a cupboard under the stairs). I chose the latter.

Luckily, I had another laptop, a tiny Samsung NC10 netbook. I’d given it to Mos when I was using the MacBook. Although the NC10 is great for putting in a backpack and walking around town, or some quick web browsing, it’s a less than ideal machine for writing. The keyboard requires microscopic precision to hit the right keys. That, or the fingers of a five-year-old. I quickly came to the conclusion that I’d need to buy a new computer.

Damian

Shortly after I lost my MacBook to the heat of Thailand I got an email. It was from a friend of mine from university, Damian. We lived together in halls of residence then again later in a private rented house in our middle year. But more notably, we started a company together. The company was set up to produce corporate videos, with the aim of moving into television production once we built up enough cash to fund the transition. Damian and I started the company with two other friends of ours. The company was very successful and started to make profit after just two months of trading. We invested in cameras, new offices, staff and all of the other expenses you would expect of a growing media business.

Damian and I had taken a year off from our studies to run the company, and decided to take a temporary step back from the company the following year to complete our final projects and assessments. Whilst completing my final projects I decided to make my ‘step back’ a more permanent move and left the company entirely. I left for a variety of reasons, I wasn’t happy with making corporate videos, but I was more concerned about the lack of ambition and professionalism from the other two, that we had started the company with. So I left, and Damian and I gradually lost contact as I moved to London and he stayed with the company in Staffordshire.

Damian’s email said that he was coming to Thailand. No reason, no explanation. I put him in contact with my travel agent friend ‘Bangkok Dave’. Damian has a reputation for jumping on the first mode of transport that he sees. So I knew Dave would get him to Chiang Mai, where I live, safely.

Damian’s arrival in Chiang Mai would provide the second obstacle to my writing. We had a huge amount of catching up to do, and beers to drink. And I still hadn’t got a new computer.

We visited all of the tourist spots, drank in all of my favourite places and ate in all of my favourite restaurants, cafe’s and eateries. I also managed to get him addicted to the ham & cheese toasties that they sell in 7 Eleven. Sorry.

One morning we decided to ride our scooters up Doi Suthep (a mountain) and shoot a time-lapse video of the sunrise. We made plenty of sandwiches and headed off. The video was great, but the real memory of the trip was just relaxing on the side of a mountain, watching the sunrise, with a good friend and my wife.

Our most memorable trip with Damian was our drive from Chiang Mai to Pai. Which has one of the most winding and stomach churning roads I’ve ever driven on. We took the truck. Halfway through the drive we discovered that the tyres where backwards. As you may or may not know, car tyres are designed to turn in one direction only. It’s designed like this to push water from under the tyre to the side. Driving on backwards tyres pulls water under the tyre resulting in a very unstable drive in wet conditions. And we found this out on a mountain road, a few hundred meters above the canyon floor on a patch of road with only a few rocks to mark the edge. We span nearly 180 degrees.  But thankfully the road was fairly empty and I managed to keep the truck on the good side of the marker rocks. Don’t worry mum, we only drove another hundred kilometres or so on these tyres…

Once we got to Pai we met up with our friend who owned a bungalow resort on the mountain. We feasted on barbecued… well… everything. We drank whiskey, beers, shots, the lot. We then headed off into Pai to a karaoke rock bar. That was fun. And the next morning we all headed home. And yes we got the tyres swapped over before driving back!

The BBQ in Pai

On the drive back, on the very top of the mountain, the truck ran out of brake fluid. It was a spectacular place to break down. Luckily the local army base was able to top us up before we headed down the mountain. Something I’d always rather do with brakes.

Damian’s next stop was Australia, where he would meet his girlfriend Georgia and go travelling around outback in a campervan. So we said our goodbyes and we sent Damian back to Bangkok on the train. Bangkok has him now.

Bangkok has him now.

Bueng Kan

Almost as soon as he’d left, Mos and I packed up the truck and headed off on the 20 hour drive to our farm in Bueng Kan. So that accounts for yet another day of no blogging. And once there, I am put to work by the family. Chasing chickens, fixing trucks, feeding dogs, rescuing motorbikes from rice fields and other general Thai farm work. And as you may have guessed, there is no WiFi connection on the farm.

Our farm is also only a few hundred meters from the Thai-Laos border. It’s a geographical border in the form of the Mekong River, which runs from central China, all the way through south-east Asia and finally into the sea in Vietnam. It is home to many legends and religious tales. And as a result is very important to the locals that live along it. Here is Mos, my brother-in-law (Foamy) and Mos’ Mum (my mother-in-law) enjoying a some lunch overlooking the Mekong.

Lunch on the Mekong

The purpose f this trip to the farm was to hand over the new truck. So after showing them the ropes and handing over the paperwork we made our way back to Chiang Mai via public transport. Which means a five-hour aircon bus from Bueng Kan to Udon Thani, followed by an overnight bus to Chiang Mai. We opted for the more expensive ‘VIP Extra’ bus. Which includes wide seats that nearly fully recline, waitress served snacks and drinks, aircon, and you also gets blankets and pillows. The one thing you can’t upgrade is the endless and tight-turning mountain roads that will ensure you can’t sleep. Good fun though.

 Harry & Charlene

Once back in Chiang Mai, just as we’d managed to grab five minutes to relax, Harry and Charlene arrived. Harry is my younger sister, she works in PR, but we mustn’t judge her on that alone. The last time I’d seen her was at my wedding which she had flown over from London for. And we all know how hard it is to get PR folk to travel without the promise of pens, mugs, lanyards and other soon-to-be-binned freebies. Charlene is Harry’s housemate in Clapham. Charlene also works in PR, but in a different field.

Mos and I decided to make a sign to welcome them to Chiang Mai when we picked them up from the airport.

Harry & Charlene

Once they had touched down, collected their bags and laughed at our sign we gave them another surprise. We took them home on the backs of our scooters. Thai Style. They looked horrified.

We got home safely, and for the next week they kept me suitably busy and as a result, offline. We had a great time, I’m fairly sure they did too. One of my favourite memories was eating on Huay Ting Tao lake, literally. We love it there.

Huay Ting Tao

Mum & John

Soon after Harry and Charlene left, less than 48 hours after, Mum and John arrived. We repeated most of the activities that we’d done with Damian, Harry and Charlene. But we also did some new ones that even Mos and I hadn’t done. We went to the Elephant Nature Park (Mos’ first time), we flew to Mae Hong Song in a tiny twelve-seat plane, took a longtail boat to visit the Karen hilltribe (longnecks). Mum and John also accompanied us on another trip to our farm in Bueng Kan, that was awesome! We had a great month. It went far too quickly. And I hope to write about it, and all of the other events in far greater detail at some point. But the purpose of this post is to detail the reasons that I’ve not blogged in so long.

Hospital
Two days ago, I took Mos to the hospital, she’d suddenly come down with something and it quickly became clear that she needed medical help. I’ve been by her side since she was admitted and I don’t plan on leaving anytime soon.

Thankfully the issue is not too serious. Something to do with a virus and low blood pressure. But solved by a few days rest in the hospital on a variety of drips. And during this time I’ve managed to catch up on my blog. I nipped out and bought a new laptop just after Damian had left. But I had hardly used it. Mos is now fully recovered and at home. And I am back on schedule with my blog.

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